Waste Water Discharge – Application Form

This is the EPA Form used for the purpose of making an application for a Waste Water Discharge Authorisation under the European Union (Waste Water Discharge) Regulations 2007 to 2020, or for the review of an existing Waste Water Discharge authorisation

It’s useful as it outlines what data the EPA collect on waste water discharges

e.g.

is it on the EPA Waste Water Priority List?

is it on the EU infringement list?

where is the primary discharge point?

what is the current plant capacity, and the remaining capacity?

is the plant overloaded?

what is are the additional waste inputs eg domestic septic tanks, industrial waste water, leachate, bypass inputs?

is there an accident prevention procedure / emergency response plan?

are there alarms / telemetry on the plant?

is there groundwater monitoring in place?

what measures are in place to prevent unintended discharges?

is the plant identified as a significant pressure on the receiving waters?

have discharges contributed to a deterioration in the quality of the receiving waters?

is there drinking water abstraction downstream of the plant?

location of monitoring stations?

Owenriff Priority Area for Action Desktop Report

Jan 2020

LAWPRO

The main pressure in this waterbody is hydromorphology from channelisation, which changing the hydrological and morphological dynamics of the river.

In terms of hydro morphology, there are historic OPW arterial drainage schemes, liaising with the OPW will be required to determine how to restore the waterbodies affected in the Owenriff PAA to their natural habitat. There are also historic land drains leading into the four river waterbodies in the PAA that maybe transporting volumes of sediment to the waterbodies, drain blocking will be required in these cases.

Forestry and peat extraction

Domestic Waste Water Treatment Systems

The number of registered domestic waste water treatment systems increased by 0.9% in 2020 to 475,990. There was an increase in every local authority in 2020 with Donegal recording the highest annual increase of 1.2% (see Figure 1 and Table 1).

In 2020 Cork had the highest proportion of domestic waste water treatment systems at 11.4% followed by Galway (8.8%), Kerry (7.1%), Donegal (6.4%), Mayo (6.1%), Tipperary (5.5%) and Wexford (5.3%). These seven counties accounted for 50.6% of all individual waste water treatment systems (see Table A and Figure 2).

Cork accounted for 14.3% of all new registrations in 2020 followed by Donegal at 8.9% (see Table 2).

Household owners accounted for 97.1% of all registered waste water treatment systems in 2020. Public authorities accounted for 1.5% and Other non-domestic owners accounted for the remaining 1.4% (see Table 3). In Longford public authorities accounted for 4.3% of all owners in 2020 whereas in Kildare they only accounted for 0.1%.

https://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/er/dwwts/domesticwastewatertreatmentsystems2020/

Irish Water planned upgrade of 21 waste water treatments plants

Twenty one additional wastewater treatment plants have been selected for upgrade as part of the Small Towns and Villages Growth Programme.

This follows the announcement of 15 projects earlier in 2021.

Additional 21 projects selected

CountyAreaFurther details:
CarlowBallinabrannaghUpgrade of the Ballinabrannagh WWTP at the existing site to provide additional capacity for growth.
CavanMullaghUpgrade of the Mullagh WWTP at the existing site to provide additional capacity for growth.
CorkBallineen/EnniskeanUpgrade of the Ballineen/Enniskean WWTP at the existing site to provide additional capacity for growth.
CorkBelgooleyThe project will amalgamate and consolidate existing wastewater treatment infrastructure in the Belgooley area into a single WWTP with capacity to cater for the existing development and projected growth.
CorkBallinspittleThe project will amalgamate and consolidate existing wastewater treatment infrastructure in the Ballinspittle area with capacity to cater for the existing development and projected growth.
CorkCastlemagnierThe project will amalgamate and consolidate existing wastewater treatment infrastructure in the Castlemagnier areas with capacity to cater for the existing development and projected growth.
DonegalMountcharlesThe project will cease discharge in Mountcharles, transferring flows to the Donegal Town network.
KildareTimolinUpgrade of the Timolin WWTP at the existing site to provide additional capacity for growth.
KilkennyBennettsbridgeThe project will amalgamate and consolidate existing wastewater treatment infrastructure in the Bennettsbridge area to cater for the existing development and projected growth. Water Supply capacity upgrade will also be provided where necessary.
LimerickHospitalUpgrade of the Hospital WWTP at the existing site to provide additional capacity for growth.
LongfordKillasheeThe project will amalgamate and consolidate existing wastewater treatment infrastructure in the Killashee areas to cater for the existing development and projected growth.
LouthCastlebellinghamUpgrade of the Castlebellingham WWTP at the existing site to provide additional capacity for growth.
MayoDoogortProvision of a new WWTP at a new site to provide additional capacity for growth
MonaghanOramUpgrade of the Oram WWTP at the existing site to provide additional capacity for growth.
RoscommonLecarrowUpgrade of the Lecarrow WWTP at the existing site to provide additional capacity for growth.
SligoMullaghmoreProvision of a new WWTP at a new site to provide capacity for growth
TipperaryKilsheelanUpgrade of the Kilsheelan WWTP at the existing site to provide additional capacity for growth.
TipperaryLisvarrinaneUpgrade of the Lisvarrinane WWTP at the existing site to provide additional capacity for growth.
WaterfordLemybrienUpgrade of the Lemybrien WWTP at the existing site to provide additional capacity for growth. Water Supply capacity upgrade will also be provided where necessary.
WexfordWellingtonbridgeUpgrade of capacity for Wellingtonbridge to provide for growth
WexfordGrahormac (Tagoat)Upgrade of the Tagoat WWTP to provide additional capacity for growth.

Projects already announced in 2021

  1. Cavan, Ballyconnell WWTP
  2. Clare, Doonbeg WWTP
  3. Cork, Killumney WWTP
  4. Cork City, Killeens WWTP
  5. Fingal, Naul WWTP
  6. Galway, Ballygar WWTP
  7. Kerry, Fenit WWTP
  8. Kerry, Knightstown WWTP
  9. Kildare, Derinturn WWTP
  10. Laois, Ballyroan WWTP
  11. Leitrim, Carrigallen WWTP
  12. Meath, Longwood WWTP
  13. Offaly, Rhode WWTP
  14. Westmeath, Ballymore WWTP
  15. Wicklow, Aughrim WWTP

Why are we losing Blue Dots?

Generally Blue Dot waters tend to be in the upper section of river catchments. For this reason, they are affected by some land use activities more than others. In addition to this Blue Dot waters are more commonly found along the Western seaboard and in mountainous areas e.g. Wicklow and Slieve Bloom Mountains. The dominant land uses in these areas are Forestry, Agriculture and Peat extraction and low density one off housing.

The profile of pressures that impact on our Blue Dots is slightly different to the pressures impacting on our Good Status water bodies. While agriculture is the most significant pressure on our good status waters, forestry is the most significant pressure on our Blue Dot waters. Forestry is a pressure on 51 (40%) of our Blue Dot waters, followed by hydromorphology in 43 (34%) water bodies, agriculture in 35 (28%) water bodies, peat extraction or disturbances in 16 (13%) water bodies and domestic waste-water in 13 (10%).

Activities that impact on our Blue Dot waterbodies in order the number of waters that are affected:

  1. Forestry
  2. Hydromorphology
  3. Agriculture
  4. Peat
  5. Other
  6. Domestic WWTP
  7. Urban WWTP
  8. Industry
  9. Mines and Quarries

http://www.lawaters.ie/bd-location-and-pressures/

River Domestic Waste Water Pressures

Significant pressures have been identified for waterbodies that are At Risk of not meeting their water quality objectives under the Water Framework Directive. While there are a multitude of pressures in every waterbody, the significant pressures are those pressures which need to be addressed in order to improve water quality. Many of our waterbodies have multiple significant pressures. A robust scientific assessment process has been carried out to determine which pressures are the significant pressures. This has incorporated over 140 datasets, a suite of modelling tools, and local knowledge from field and enforcement staff from the Local Authorities, Inland Fisheries Ireland and EPA. Impacts from domestic waste water include nutrient and organic pollution. This assessment synthesises over a decade of field studies on on-site systems in Ireland across many different soils types and combines factors relating to the efficiency of the septic tank systems with attenuation factors for the hydrogeological flow pathway.

https://data.gov.ie/dataset/river-domestic-waste-water-pressures?package_type=dataset

Groundwater Domestic Waste Water Pressures

Significant pressures have been identified for waterbodies that are At Risk of not meeting their water quality objectives under the Water Framework Directive. While there are a multitude of pressures in every waterbody, the significant pressures are those pressures which need to be addressed in order to improve water quality. Many of our waterbodies have multiple significant pressures. A robust scientific assessment process has been carried out to determine which pressures are the significant pressures. This has incorporated over 140 datasets, a suite of modelling tools, and local knowledge from field and enforcement staff from the Local Authorities, Inland Fisheries Ireland and EPA. Impacts from domestic waste water include nutrient and organic pollution. This assessment synthesises over a decade of field studies on on-site systems in Ireland across many different soil types and combines factors relating to the efficiency of the septic tank systems with attenuation factors for the hydrogeological flow pathway.

https://data.gov.ie/dataset/groundwater-domestic-waste-water-pressures?package_type=dataset